Researchers in Stockholm (Sweden) have recently published a new report indicating that the removal of the appendix or tonsils could reduce a person's risk of developing Parkinson's. This research supports the findings of a study published in 2018 by researchers at Van Andel Institute (Michigan, USA), which was partly supported by The Cure Parkinson's Trust.

This new study involved the analysis of the Swedish medical records of 78,650 people with Parkinson's compared to 40 times that of data from 'controls'. The investigators found that removal of the appendix resulted in a 16% lower risk of developing Parkinson's, while having a person's tonsils extracted was associated with an 8% lower risk of developing Parkinson's.

The new study differed from the previous study because a different study design was used. More cases of Parkinson's with appendectomies were identified in the data, and the lowered risk was still apparent.

The researchers suggested that this new data provides additional evidence supporting a possible role of the gastrointestinal system in the development of Parkinson's.

Read the full report: Frontiers in Neurology